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Liverpool Terminals Car Hire Tips

History Liverpool

The port of Liverpool was established by King John in 1207. The English had already conquered Ireland and John needed a port to send soldiers and supplies across the Irish Sea. King John started a weekly market as there were hardly any shops, but soon craftsmen and tradesmen would come to live in Liverpool and an annual fair, a very important event in medieval times, brought to Liverpool buyers and sellers from all over northwest England.

Liverpool was cut into plots called burgages on which people could build houses. Then, in 1229, John granted the merchants the right to form an organization called a guild to protect their interests. As in many medieval towns the Merchant's Guild also ran Liverpool and the guildsmen elected an official called the Reeve to run the town as mayor. In the 14th century, Liverpool had a population of about 1,000 people, carpenters and blacksmiths, farmers and fishermen, brewers and butchers and craftsmen. Watermills ground grain into flour, wine from France was imported and skins and hides were brought from Ireland while iron and wool were sent to other markets. The first chapel in Liverpool was the Chapel of St Mary. By the middle of the 14th century there was a castle at Liverpool.

A grammar school was founded in Liverpool in the beginning of the 16th century. Liverpool was sacked the Royalists during the Civil War in June 1644 Prince Rupert led a royalist army against the town. He described Liverpool as a mere crow’s nest which a parcel of boys could take. Liverpool began to flourish in the late 17th century with the growth of English colonies in North America and the West Indies as it was well placed to trade with markets across the Atlantic. Celia Fiennes gives an altogether different picture of Liverpool in those days. Alm houses were built and the first parish church was St Peters, built in the beginning of the 18th century.

Weather

The weather in Liverpool can be same as it is in the whole of England which is unpredictable, the recommended time to visit the place is during the month of June and August when there is sunshine and the summer feels good. But, there is no guarantee that it will not rain.

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Best Liverpool

Everything in Liverpool seems to swirl around two poles: the Fab Four Story and the marvellous Anfield, challenging one another on which better represents the Mersey spirit of Liverpool, though both spirits dwell in the same city and attract millions of tourists and visitors every year. Like the two sides of the same Golden coin, Beatlemaniacs (or just lovers of some of the best songs that were ever written) will find the Beatles Story museum on Gower Street. Also, for those interested in the Liverpool Football Club Museum and Stadium Tour, remember that the address is Anfield road while Abbey Road is the name of the one-before last 12 times US platinum album of the Beatles released in 1969. At Beatles Story you can see a genuine replica of the Abbey Road studio where the first singles were recorded and there's lots of genuine memorabilia to keep all Beatles fans happy.

Particularly impressive is the full-size replica of the famous but pretty small Cavern Club while George Harrison's cheap first guitar (now worth half a million pounds) should inspire penniless but faithful musicians to keep going. The museum is also the departure point for the Yellow Duckmarine Tour. Liverpool's biggest tourist attraction is Albert Dock. Almost three hectares of water ringed by enormous cast-iron columns and imposing five-storey warehouses, the country's largest collection of protected buildings, and a World Heritage Site. A wide development project has revived the dock and here you'll find worth visiting museums and an extension of London's Tate Gallery, together with top-class restaurants and bars. The Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King, known as Paddy's Wigwam, Liverpool's Catholic cathedral, is a modern building that looks like a soaring concrete tee. It was completed in 1967 and the central tower frames the world's largest stained-glass window, created by John Piper and Patrick Reyntiens.

Exploring Liverpool

Liverpool is a city of maritime tradition, culture and vibrant modern character and that is something visitors will not discover right away. When you are through with your Beatle tours and your Liverpool FC memorabilia shopping, both most joy able activities that could take up most of your time in this city, there are still some brilliant spots that can give you a sort of an inner circle taste of Liverpool. After you have had your gargantuan English breakfast, you can use the city’s excellent public transportation to take you around the city. Your first stop might be at Liverpool's Anglican Cathedral. It is Britain's largest church and the world's largest Anglican cathedral, thanks to Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, since its construction is his life's work. Sir Scott also devised the red telephone box and designed the Southwark Power Station in London. The central bell is the world's third largest while the organ, with its 9,765 pipes, must be the world's largest operational model.

After a tour of St George’s Hall, you can visit the Merseyside Maritime Museum tells the story of one of the world's great ports. One of exhibits Emigration to a New World, describes vividly the struggle with poverty of nine million emigrants and their efforts to get to North America and Australia; the model of a typical ship showing just how tough conditions on board were. Poverty, immigration and the slave trade, exotic goods coming from the colonies across the Atlantic Ocean, magnificent civic buildings and Cathedrals of worship, tradition along with Modern Art and culture are the trademarks of the wonderful city of Liverpool. The oldest Black African community in the country and the oldest Chinese community in Europe, a historical port and home to the most popular group in music history as well as Liverpool FC, a myth for Football fans, Liverpool is a cosmopolitan metropolis you will never know before you taste some traditional Liverpool Scouse.

Eating drinking Liverpool

While shopping or visiting the sights visitors to Liverpool must remember that England is the home of John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich who invented the ideal quick meal and regardless of your eating habits or country of origin, it is a snack that is indispensable when you are traveling and honestly, should you ever wanted to, it would be impossible to do without it when in the UK. Cucumber sandwiches with tea are a unique, soothing experience that visitors should not miss. Other than sandwich and tea shops, convenient solutions for visitors in Liverpool are fast food restaurants (but then a hamburger is actually a meat sandwich), pizzerias and fish and chips venues. There are plenty of brilliant pubs offering well cooked food and beer and there is a wide choice of take away ethnic restaurants. Quality food is combined with excellent service and a touch of luxury and class.

At Liverpool you can taste cuisines from everywhere in the world, but you can also taste a dish the Liverpudlians still enjoy as part of their heritage Scouse is a stew made of cheap lamb or beef cuts. Lobscouse or labskaus, means stew and the word refers to a meat based stew commonly eaten by sailors throughout northern seaports such as Liverpool. A "pan of scouse" became a common meal in working class Liverpool. A mutton or lamb stew with vegetables, cooked to tenderize cheap cuts of meat, it is often in local pub and cafe menus, although recipes sometimes include ingredients which do not agree with the Thrifty roots of the dish. Scouse eventually came into common English to describe the local accent of Liverpool.

Nightlife Liverpool

Liverpool’s night life is infamous across the UK and the friendly debate with Manchester about which city has the better drinking bars, dancing clubs and music hot spots has been going on for years, much to the benefit of visitors and local youth who see new places that open up every day and a constant renovation and musical update that brings Liverpool to the first line of afterhours entertainment. The main areas where you can have a blast of a time are close to one another and you can walk from one bar to another and enjoy the lively crowd of students, young professionals and tourists who are out to have a good time and one or two reviving drinks. There is music coming from everywhere and sometimes, as it happens, different songs coming from different clubs combine and make a dazzling cocktail of rhythm.

The atmosphere is warm and rather casual but you can always wear your high heels or designer T-shirt and mingle. In case of a sudden shower you and your company can go indoors and enjoy what’s going on or take a quick taxi to the next place. Concert Square is a good start for your night out in Liverpool. It is the centre and heartbeat of Liverpool's buzzing nightlife and visitors will instantly get the message when they enter Concert Square about 10:30pm on a Friday or Saturday night. Mathew Street is very popular and if you're looking for something a little trendy then head to Victoria Street next door or nearby St Peters Square and you will have a good taste of what Liverpool is all about. If you care to do a bit of sightseeing when go out at night then Albert Dock is the place while Eberle Street is where the hard core scene of Liverpool stays up late.

Shopping Liverpool

The popularity of the Beatles and the other groups from the Mersey beat musical period contributes to Liverpool's status and forms a significant part of the city's economy. The city is full of shops selling Beatle mania, memorabilia and music stores promoting A Flock of Seagulls, Frankie goes to Hollywood, Echo and the Bunnymen and other groups from Liverpool, together with whatever is newest in the world music scene. The city is an Internationalmusic metropolis recognized by Guinness as the World Capital city of Pop. Liverpool shopping is world class and shoppers are spoilt for choice. Gleaming new city Liverpool ONE, right in the heart of the city, shopping centres and boutique arcades, little secret spots offering this and that together with open air farmer�s markets invite visitors in Liverpool to shop until they drop. ONE, is the new designer Liverpool shopping centre that features more than 160 famous high street names, including John Lewis and Apple Dirty Kidz and the Kid’s Cavern Are for the younger visitors. There is the also the exclusive Metquarter, where you will find more select fashion outlets such as Jo Malone, Molton Brown and MAC. For the boys there is Gieves & Hawkes. But in your Liverpool shopping you could also include fashionable Cavern Walks, home to Vivienne Westwood and WAGS favourite Cricket, which sells rather expensive handbags and designer clothes. Lark Lane is also a delightful destination full of bohemian boutiques and street markets.

disabled visitors Liverpool

Starting from their arrival at Liverpool John Lennon International Airport, travellers with special needs will find what is required for a safe transport to their accommodation. Special toilet facilities, ramps and pathways, lifts to all levels, wheelchairs and special carts on request as well as well as an Ambulift will assist them for as long as they are in the Airport. There are low level telephones available next to Travelworld and special parking facilities are available. LPL is a busy airport but services here are top class. Disabled visitors should also keep in mind that there are strict Internationalregulations concerning disabled passengers and any airport in the world cannot be licensed without abiding by them.

There are many beautiful hotels in Liverpool that are wheelchair accessible and with great arrangements for the city’s visitors who are physically disabled. Lists of such hotels and provided amenities can easily be obtained at central spots or through relevant Internet sites. In the city of Liverpool there are special provisions for the disabled and many facilities are offered. Not just in hotels but also in parks, civic buildings, churches and museums, special preparations have been made so that people who are physically impaired or are disabled can also visit the beautiful city and enjoy all its pleasures like every other visitor.

There are special Disability Support groups of volunteers willing to assist in any possible way. It is also good to know that the extensive network of Liverpool buses is a very comfortable way to go around the city. Last but not least of Liverpool�s pleasures, watching a match where Liverpool FC is playing is a memorable event in itself and a lot of people come to Liverpool just for that. The Liverpool Disabled Supporters Association (LDSA) is run by disabled supporters for disabled supporters.